Diffusion Of Innovations Theory

A hypothesis outlining how new technological and other advancements spread throughout societies and cultures, from introduction to wider-adoption. The diffusion of innovations theory seeks to explain how and why new ideas and practices are adopted, with timelines potentially spread out over long periods.

The way in which innovations are communicated to different parts of society and the subjective opinions associated with the innovations are important factors in how quickly diffusion - or spreading - occurs.

Factors that affect the rate of innovation diffusion include the mix of rural to urban population within a society, the society's level of education and the extent of industrialization and development. Different societies are likely to have different adoption rates (the rate at which members of a society accept a new innovation) for different types of innovation. For example, a society may have adopted the internet faster than it adopted the automobile due to cost, accessibility and familiarity with technological change.


Investment dictionary. . 2012.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Diffusion of innovations — The diffusion of innovations according to Rogers. With successive groups of consumers adopting the new technology (shown in blue), its market share (yellow) will eventually reach the saturation level. In mathematics the S curve is known as the… …   Wikipedia

  • Diffusion (business) — Diffusion is the process by which a new idea or new product is accepted by the market. The rate of diffusion is the speed that the new idea spreads from one consumer to the next. Adoption is similar to diffusion except that it deals with the… …   Wikipedia

  • Diffusion (disambiguation) — Diffusion is a time dependent random process causing a spread in space. Diffusion may also refer to: In physical sciences Molecular diffusion, spontaneous dispersion of mass (distinct from migration, caused by an external force) Conduction of… …   Wikipedia

  • Diffusion process — For the marketing term, see Diffusion of innovations. In probability theory, a branch of mathematics, a diffusion process is a solution to a stochastic differential equation. It is a continuous time Markov process with continuous sample paths. A… …   Wikipedia

  • Normalization process theory — is a sociological theory of the implementation, embedding, and integration of new technologies and organizational innovations developed by Carl R. May, Tracey Finch, and others.[1][2][3] The theory is a contribution to the field of science and… …   Wikipedia

  • Trans-cultural diffusion — In cultural anthropology and cultural geography, cultural diffusion, as first conceptualized by Alfred L. Kroeber in his influential 1940 paper Stimulus Diffusion, or trans cultural diffusion in later reformulations, is the spread of cultural… …   Wikipedia

  • List of types of systems theory — This list of types of systems theory gives an overview of different types of systems theory, which are mentioned in scientific book titles or articles. [Their are a lot of book titles named ... systems: theory and applications . This leaves the… …   Wikipedia

  • Consumer adoption of technological innovations — is the process consumers use to determine whether or not to adopt an innovation. This process is influenced by consumer characteristics, such as personality traits and demographic or socioeconomic factors, the characteristics of the new product,… …   Wikipedia

  • Two step flow theory — La théorie nommée « Two step flow theory » a été développée par Paul Lazarsfeld (avec Bernard Berelson et Hazel Gaudet) après la Seconde Guerre mondiale, aux États Unis, dans son livre The People s Choice (1944). Il s agit d une analyse …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Network theory — For network theory of the regulation of the adaptive immune system see Immune network theory For the sociological theory, see Social network Network theory is an area of computer science and network science and part of graph theory. It has… …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.